Leigh-Anne Krometis

Welcome!

Growth of human populations and accompanying increased urbanization often introduces new contaminants to the environment or creates new pathways of human exposure to existing risks while simultaneously creating an ever-increasing demand for high quality natural resources, particularly clean water. In order to promote development while preserving public health, it is necessary to identify potential threats and engineer solutions to minimize exposure and risk. The broad goals of our research group are to:

  1. Identify (detect, quantify) waterborne agents that pose a threat to public health
  2. Characterize environmental transport pathways that may result in human exposure to these contaminants
  3. Assess the relative risks of specific contaminants in order to prioritize interventions (remediation)

In keeping with these goals, specific research group projects include: detection of human and non-human markers of fecal contamination in private drinking water supplies; identification of correlations between demographic characteristics and drinking water contamination by E. coli and/or heavy metals in rural communities; development of a stochastic model to estimate human risk associated with indicator bacteria impaired watersheds; assessment of the proximity of state-identified water quality impairments in Central Appalachia to mining and agricultural landuses; and characterization of patterns of sediment and water contamination by pollutants of human health concern in Stroubles Creek. Laboratory analyses related to these efforts are conducted in the BSE Water Microbiology Laboratory in Seitz Hall.

Announcements/News

  • May 2015: Welcome to three new Krometis lab students: Jake Cantor, Kyle Jacobs, and Jordan Wetzig.
  • April 2015: Congratulations to Dr. Hehuan Liao, who just successfully defended her dissertation!
  • There are no further openings in the Krometis group for graduate students at this time.